'El Greco: 400 Years After'

'El Greco: 400 Years After'

A symposium celebrating the art of El Greco in the 400th anniversary of the artist’s death.

The National gallery of Art, in coordination with SPAIN arts & culture, will hold a symposium to celebrate the art of El Greco in the 400th anniversary of the artist’s death (1541-1614).

Spanish scholars Fernando Marías, professor of Art History (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid-RAh). and curator Luis Alberto Pérez (The Greek of Toledo, Museo Santa Cruz, Toledo) —along with visiting assistant professor Livia Stoenescu (University of Houston-Clear Lake), Jeongho Park and curatorial fellow Anne L. Poulet (The Frick Collection)— will discuss El Greco’s career focusing on his early years in Greece and Italy and his renowned work completed in the city of Toledo, Spain. The symposium will be introduced by Felix Monguilot Benzal (Kress Interpretive Fellow, 2012–2013.)

Besides the symposium, the National Gallery of Art will celebrate El Greco on March 24 with the lecture Patrons, Artists, and Saints: El Greco in the Chapel of San José in Toledo, by Felix Monguilot Benzal (Kress Interpretive Fellow, 2012–2013). This event will take place between 12:10 and 1:10 pm, at the Large Auditorium of the East Building. The lecture will focus on the history of the Chapel of San José in the Spanish city of Toledo, a private religious space where El Greco worked for one of the wealthiest families of the town and in one of his most challenging projects. This event is free and open to the public.

View program (PDF).

  • Visual arts
  • Washington, D.C.
  • Sat, March 22, 2014
  • 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Venue

Venue map

The National Gallery of Art, West Building Lecture Hall, 6th Street and Constitution Avenue, Washington, District of Columbia 20565

Admission

Free

More information

The National Gallery of Art

Credits

Presented by The National Gallery of Art in collaboration with SPAIN arts & culture. Image: El Greco (Domenikos Theotokopoulos), Saint Martin and the Beggar, 1597-1599, oil on canvas with wooden strip added at bottom, National Gallery of Art, Widener Collection.

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